Monday, 12 June 2017

OH SO RUSTY "METALLIC" STEAMPUNK GOGGLES

Hello all!  

Welcome back to Andy Skinner's Creative Team blog posts! 


This time around, I drifted towards the world of steampunk to create these very rusty, weathered "metallic" goggles.  From Tando Creative, I am amazed at how sturdy these are even before you apply any product to them.

Let's go through the steps in transforming these from plain greyboard into old weathered "metallic" gems of an era gone by.

To create these goggles, you will need:

  • DecoArt Old Worlde Decoupage Paper
  • DecoArt Media Matte Medium
  • DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Raw Umber
  • DecoArt Multi Surface Metallic Champagne 
  • DecoArt Media Liquid Glue
  • DecoArt Media Ultra Matte Varnish
  • DecoArt Media Crackle Paste
  • DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Cobalt Teal Hue
  • DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Carbon Black
  • DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Quinacridone Red
  • DecoArt Media Antiquing Cream Raw Umber
  • DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Metallic Silver
  • DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Transparent Yellow Iron Oxide
  • DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Titanium White
  • DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Quinacridone Gold
  • Decoart Media Crackle Glaze

  • Tando Creative 3D Steampunk Goggles Kit
  • Tando Creative Industrial Elements Bolts and Washers Sheet
  • Tando Creative Decorative Hinges
  • Andy Skinner Industrial Set
  • Andy Skinner Steampunk
Miscellaneous Supplies include:
  • Craft Mat
  • Brushes
  • Craft Knife and Mat
  • Double Sided Adhesive Tape
  • Brayer
  • Small Adhesive Half Pearls
  • Jewelry Wire
  • Chain
Now let's get started on the pictorial tutorial so you can see how these wonderful products all came together to create the illusion of these "metallic" steampunk goggles...


Begin by taking laying out the pieces of the goggles. Choose the DecoArt Decoupage Paper you will use to cover the cylindrical areas of your goggles.  Brush DecoArt Media Matte Medium over the surface of the goggles and lay a piece of the paper over them.  Burnish in place using a brayer and your fingers to smooth out any air bubbles or wrinkles.  Use a craft knife and a mat to cut out around the tabs of the goggle pieces. 


Paint the backside of the goggles first with DecoArt Multi Surface Metallic Champagne followed by DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Raw Umber.  Then using your finger, lightly add more Champagne to the surface.  Let dry or gently heat set.  This finishes off the inside of the goggles and provides a leathery look.
** As you are drying, gently curve these goggle pieces so that they will bend quite easily when dry.  They will form circles and the paper needs to be worked as it is drying.  


Add Double Sided Adhesive Tape to both sides of the goggle pieces.  Overlap the edges to complete the circle; leaving just enough room to add a plain chipboard circle for support.


Push the tabs in and glue a couple of them at a time using DecoArt Media Liquid Glass.  Hold them in place until they are secure and repeat this process until all tabs are glued.



Since these cylinders are paper, I sealed them with DecoArt Media Ultra Matte Varnish so that I could add more layers to the paper without causing it to deteriorate.  Let dry or gently heat set.



Brush the next pieces of the goggles:  the lens covers and decorative hinges with DecoArt Multi Surface Metallic Champagne.  Paint both sides and let dry.



Add a layer of DecoArt Media Crackle Paste randomly or completely over the surface of the pieces.  I did NOT cover the lattice of the lenses.  As with all DecoArt Crackle products, let air dry.



Once dry, create the illusion of weathered, rusted metal. I used my fingers on all of this instead of brushes.  First layer is tapping with the Metallic Champagne again followed by randomly tapping DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Cobalt Teal Hue.  This begins a patina look.  Next I randomly tapped DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Raw Umber.  Next I applied a layer of DecoArt Media Raw Umber Antiquing Cream over the entire piece and removed the excess.  This gives a warm feeling to the piece and slightly darkens and blends all of the colors together.  I added a bit more Cobalt Teal Hue and Champagne until I was happy with the look.  Then I added just touches of DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Carbon Black around the edges and barely around the center of the lenses, feathering up into the lattice work.  Finally I painted the insert hearts with DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Quinacridone Red for a "pop" or color.  Let dry.



While the above parts of the goggles were drying, I painted the basic frame of the goggles and some bolts and washers with DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Metallic Silver.  This is a good "metallic" base for what is to come.



Using my finger, I randomly applies DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Carbon Black over the surface of the silver to dull it and create an aged, weathered look.  Do this to both sides of the goggles for a finished look.



Use a brayer to pick up some black paint and run the brayer over Andy Skinner's Steampunk and Industrial stamps.  Then randomly stamp on the surface of the goggles.  This creates an interesting design.


To seal and also add even more detail to the goggles, brush over them with DecoArt Media Crackle Glaze and let air dry.


Now for even more layers to create that patina, weathered illusion!  This time, I began with light random touches of DecoArt Media Fluid acrylics Titanium White followed by Cobalt Teal Hue.  (Sometimes I even mixed these two colors before tapping them onto the surface of the goggles.  Next I added slight touches of DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Transparent Yellow Iron Oxide for that "warm" feeling and the way it blends all of the colors together.  LOVE IT!  Finally, I added touches of Carbon Black around the edges and a little feathered into the goggles for depth and aging.  Notice the porcelain crackles that come through the patina look?  Awesome!



I brushed some of the basic colors of the goggles onto some little half pearls with adhesive backing and let them dry.  Then, using DecoArt Media Liquid Glass as a glue, I added the pearls to the rounded tabs on the goggles.  Here you see the finished result of adding these little pearls that now become "rivets" after they are aged with the magic of DecoArt Media products!


You receive several pieces with this 3D kit.  So I began stacking the pieces for more depth.  You primarily need to paint the outside edges because they will be sandwiches in between the pieces you've already completely painted and detailed.



Here is the front side of the goggles before I glued on an extra plain ring on each side and the goggle lenses.  After this picture was taken, I added touches of DecoArt Media Fluid Acrylics Quinacridone Gold to give that "rusty" look.  You will see it on the photo below.  This paint adds so much detail.  It's amazing!



I love this picture because it gives you an up close look at all of the detail on these little goggles.  They really look like rusted, weathered metal!  The little bolts and washers that are added along with the pearl "rivets" really "sells" the metallic look.



Glue the decorative hinges onto the sides of the goggles to cover the seam where you taped them together.  I decided to add a piece of chain for fun.  To do this, I punched a little hole in the goggle sides and added an altered washer.  I added a piece of jewelry wire through the chain link and twisted it to make it more secure.  Then I pushed the wire through the small hole I'd created on the side of the goggles and glued the wire into place on the inside wall of the goggle.  I repeated this for the other side as well.



In this close up picture of the detailed sides of the goggles, you will see how the wire and chain connection looks on the side of the goggles.  You will also see that I randomly added touches of the patina effect on the cylinders of the goggles to finish the weathered look.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope that you've enjoyed this tutorial.  It is my hope that it's given you some inspiration to try these techniques for yourself and experiment with creating illusions of rusted, weathered metal.  It is so fun and you will be patting yourself on the back when you see what YOU can actually create!



12 comments:

  1. What an absolutely fantastic tutorial! I have a set of these goggles and had no idea what to do with them until now! Thank you! Anne x

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    1. Thank you so much Anne. You will LOVE playing with the goggles!

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  2. Totally awesome Andy ...definitely will be back for a closer look at the wonderful details

    TFS
    Annie

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  3. Very cool! Thanks for the tutorial!

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    1. Hi Stephanie. So glad you found the tutorial helpful. And thank you for your nice comment.

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  4. Brilliantly altered and put together Candy, fabulous process steps to see how you achieved all the effects xxx

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    1. Hello Brenda! Thank you so much for the comments. I hope your leg continues to heal nicely.

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  5. A brilliant project and step by step Candy x

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  6. Candy girl,
    You rock those DecoArt products!!
    Jackie xo

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Your comments are always read and very much appreciated.